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How to Make an Easy, Reusable, No-Sew, Table Skirt

So last year I was going to make this beautiful table skirt with long strips of fabric tied around a piece of ribbon. I’m sure you have seen pictures on Pinterest. I stood in Jo-Anne’s fabric store for hours over the course of a couple of days debating over the best coordinating patterns and colors. I picked out some patterns with blues and greens in them to match my neon green door–seriously my door is painted neon green. Then time went by, and I found other things more important as I moved into my room. Hence, I never made the skirt. Feeling overwhelmed by cutting that many pieces of fabric strips in a straight line and hearing from another teacher how much work these skirts took…I decided to try something else.

Easy, no-sew, reusable fabric table skirt enters! I had noticed a teacher last year tack fabric to her desk with push pins and it stayed with no trouble. This teacher’s fabric just hung straight with not pleats, ruffles, etc. This gave me an idea! I measured the fabric to make sure I had enough to go around the front and sides of the table I wanted to cover. Instead of sewing a hem in the bottom, I folded it over and taped it with masking tape. It looks just like the hem had been sewn. No one will ever know the difference. Next, I started at one end of the table and put a thumbtack in the fabric and through the table. Most school type tables are made with particle wood and so a tack will push right through this.

If you double the fabric over itself about an inch then this makes nice pleats.  I did this about every five inches.  I wasn’t super precise with my measuring, but if you lay a yard stick down beside the edge of the table to measure, it works out pretty evenly.

As you can see, the finished skirt is below.  This fabric helps to really brighten up the room and gave me a ton of extra storage, which I really needed.  This project took me probably less than two hours.  The most time is spent measuring.

What’s great about this project is that I did no damage to the fabric.  I didn’t sew the hem.  I didn’t hot glue the hem.  I didn’t even hot glue the fabric to the table.  What does this mean?  I can use this fabric over for another project like a bulletin board, a table cloth etc. if I ever want to.

So here’s the step by step process you need if you plan on adding a skirt to one of your tables.

  1. Measure the fabric to make sure you have enough to go around the sides of the table.  If you want a pleat every 5 inches, then divide the total inches of the sides of the table you are covering by 5.  This is your number of pleats.  Then multiply this pleats number by 2.  This gives you extra fabric to overlap when making your pleats.  Add this number to the sides of the table you are covering.  This should give you the length of fabric you will need to cover the table.
  2. I made the height of the fabric about 26 or 27 inches to hang enough to cover my junk.  I made the official height 25 inches hanging from the edge of the table.  The extra 1 or 2 inches gave me enough to make my masking tape hem.  You could make your hem longer, but I really didn’t want to have it dragging on the floor for foot traffic.
  3. Start at the end of the table and tack in your fabric.
  4. Measure 5 inches (or however many inches distance you want your pleats).
  5. Overlap your fabric about an inch and place another tack on top of the overlapped fabric.
  6. Continue repeating this pattern until you make it to the end of the area you are wanting covered.

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