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Base Ten Number Line

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Ms. K

Make Snowflakes and Learn Math!

What a great way to sneak math into a fun winter activity!  Have students figure out how many degrees will have to be in each angle if a hexagon shape is cut into a snowflake.  Well. 60 degrees of course because 60×6 angles would make 360 degrees.  You can also discuss symmetry after they are cut out to see if the snowflakes truly did turn out symmetrically.

I had students cut these out for a fun enrichment activity.  First of all, I read a portion of this book to them since it is about the science behind snowflakes.  Did you know snow is NOT MADE by freezing raindrops?  Me neither.  It is made by frozen water droplets smaller than the tip of your hair.  It takes over 100.000 water droplets to make one snowflake.  This information and more are included in this unique book which gives the science behind snowflakes.

After I read students a portion of this book, we made snowflakes.  I will show you below.  The more you do it the better you get!

Step 1:  Get a pair of scissors and a sheet of 8.5 x 11 computer printer paper.

Step 2.  Fold the paper in half “hamburger style” or the fat way.

Step 3.  Fold the paper in half again. Make sure the open corners are facing you.  If they are not facing you then your snowflake will be cut in half unintentionally, and you will be left wondering why this happened.

Step 4: Fold the top corner down until it is slightly over the bottom of the rectangle above.  I have not changed the orientation of the paper to accomplish this.  The open corner are still in the same location as above

Step 5:  Finally fold the bottom triangle over the other triangle in a waffle cone type of configuration–(that’s what the kids called it)

Step 6.  Slide the end of the “waffle cone” off of the rest of the figure.  and you will be left with the bottom of the “waffle cone” which is a triangle.

Step 7.  Cut any type of figures you like into the triangle and experiment with different patterns.

Step 8.  Open up your snowflake and see what you have created!

Hang them up  in your classroom for a festive winter theme!

Welcome 2019!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!


Lessons on snowflakes coming soon! 🙂

Fun Christmas Lesson While Learning a Little History!

This year just for fun I let my students experience the “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” song during a 30 minute enrichment lesson. First, I let the students watch this video in which Gayla Peevey sings the song.

Then I give the students a copy of the words, and I rewind it to the beginning so the students can sing it with the words. At about 2:34 I stop the song and ask the students to tell me what they think happened to Gayla later in her life. I’ve heard students say several things ranging from Gayla became famous all the way to Gayla died. Then I ask them how old they think Gayla is today. I give students a few minutes to figure out how old she is (Gayla’s age and the date of the video show on the video). Then I play the remainder of the video for students to see Gayla all grown up at 73 years old.

Next, I read students a little history of Gayla’s life from this website. Then I follow up with having the students write an acrostic poem with the word hippopotamus. Students were so proud of their acrostic poems! If time, sing the song again! I always like singing the song because it makes me happy and makes the kids happy, too. Here are a few of the student’s acrostic poems. Enjoy!

Try This Fun STEAM Activity!

This fun STEAM activity has many advanced skills.  Students won’t be aware they are doing critical thinking, creativity, and symmetry.  A teacher friend showed me how students can write their name on one side of a paper and rub the paper so that the other side of the paper will show a reflection of the name that was written.  Then students turn their names into a monster or creature.  This is fun to do around October, but could be done at any time.  I actually did this in November with no complaints. 🙂

Here is an example of a name monster by a girl with the name Anna.  You will have to turn your head sideways to see the name written, since the name was written on the horizontal crease on the paper.  Details are following.

To make a name monster, students must do the following:

1. Turn the paper horizontally and fold the paper on the crease.

2.Next, they must write their name in pencil (or you can use graphite sticks for darker pencil lines–thanks to the art teacher for these).

3. Then students can do either of the following depending on how difficult you want to make the task.

**You can have them go over their name more darkly with the pencil and then fold the paper back over onto the other side and rub the paper with a sharpie lid or some other hard object so that the graphite from the pencil wears off.  This is the easier option if you can find a hard lid for the name to rub off on the other side.

**You can have children draw the reflection of the name on the other side to teach symmetry.  This requires some critical thinking because students have to visualize and write their letters in a flipped direction. (more difficult option).

4.Once students have traced their name on the other side of the paper, they can add features to their name making a creature.  This will take some creativity on the students’ part.  They will have to imagine some of the letters in their name to be like shoes, eyes, arms, or the like.  Every feature that students add MUST be symmetrical.

5.Next have the students color their creature.

Below is the name Liza.

At the end of this lesson I like to have students share their work so other students can appreciate the work their peers did.  Also, I have students trace their name with their finger so other students can see the work they have done.  Have students point out the features they added to their creature as well, such as if they added eyeballs, a tongue, shoes etc.  For extra creativity, have students name their creature.

This would make a great beginning of year task when everyone is learning names or a great Halloween activity!

 

Don’t Miss Out on the Cyber Sale on TPT!

Attention all teachers!  Make sure you don’t miss out on the Cyber Sale on Teachers Pay Teachers November 26th and 27th, 2018.  That is this Monday and Tuesday!  All items in my store will be 25% off! 🙂 Snatch up all those items on TPT you have been swooning over!  Happy shopping!


Happy Thanksgiving!

Fun, Free, Halloween, Pumpkin Activity!

I just learned about this fun, free, Halloween, pumpkin activity this year!  The kids absolutely love it!  I used it with kindergarten and first graders.  All the teachers that have seen it love it too!  First stock up on some orange paper!  I used copy paper.

Read this Story.  A teacher friend gave it to me, but I changed out the witch and ghost for a mouse and a cricket. ( i don’t know who wrote this story, but if I knew I would give credit.

As you read the story the children will fold and cut as the directions in the story tell them to.

Once upon a time a very small mouse was walking in the woods. The cold wind was blowingthe dry leaves all around her. The little mouse was frantically searching for a house for the winter. She could not find one. Suddenly a piece of orange paper, blown by the wind landed at her feet. She picked it up. The little mouse looked closely at the paper and then she said, “I shall make myself a little house from this piece of orange paper.”

She folded the paper in half.

Then she took her scissors–she always carried a pair in her pocket.(Cut off the two corners to make a roof. Cut the construction paper as a story indicates.) 

 

This will do just fine, she said as she looked at her new house, but I will need a door. With her scissors she cut a door. She cut a special door for her pointy nose.(Cut a rectangle shape with one endpoint up more towards the bottom of the folded edge.)

The little mouse walked through the door into the little orange house it was very dark inside. She quickly hurried back out. I will need to make windows to let in the light in,”she said. The little mouse cut a front and back window (cut a square shape in the middle of the paper opposite end of the paper than the door. Cut through both sides of the paper. I have students fold the paper a bit to get their scissors in the paper.) 

Oh it was a very fine looking house. Her very own little house with a roof, a door, and windows was all finished. But just as the little mouse started to go inside for the winter, she saw a tiny cricket come down the wind- swept path. As the cricket came to a stop near the little house, the little mouse saw that the cricket was crying. Why are you crying asked the little mouse? The tiny cricket stopped crying and answered, “it is cold and windy. It is getting dark and I have no place to spend the winter.” “You may spend the winter with me in my new house,” said the little mouse. “Oh thank you!” the happy tiny cricket said as she peeked in through the window. “This is a very nice house!” “First,” said the mouse, “ I will need to make you a little door of your very own.” She took her scissors again and began to cut. She cut a very tiny door.(Cut a triangle on the fold of the paper between the big door and the window. Make a longer part of the triangle point up)

The two happy friends went inside. The tiny cricket went in the very little door, and a little mouse went in through her own special door. All winter long they lived happily together inside a little orange house. Do you want to see inside their little orange house?  Just open your piece of paper and surprise!

 

Before you open the paper, take predictions from the students to see if they can tell you what the inside of the house will look like.



What do you see? A pumpkin of course!

I hope your children enjoy this as much as mine did!

5 Fun Activities for Halloween

  1. Halloween Oronyms/MadGabs.  In case you don’t know oronyms are phrases that are that sound like another phrase.  These would be most appropriate for third, fourth or fifth graders.  My students absolutely LOVE these.  For example, COUNTER ACT YOU LAW = COUNT DRACULA.  Check these out by sawdust girl.
  2. Pumpkin Logic Puzzles with ordinal numbers:  Check out this fun logic puzzle by KinderIRick on Teachers Pay Teachers Pay Teachers.  This would be perfect for your kinder or first students!
  3. Don’t forget Super Teacher Worksheets!  You can find this fun crypto riddle for free! This would be great for K-2. 
  4. Halloween Hink Pinks.  Hink pInks are rhyming words that answer a riddle.  They are usually one syllable.  For example, ghost toast would be the answer to a Hink Pink riddle.  These would be most appropriate for third-fifth graders.

5.  Pumpkin Patch Math Investigations.  These are different activities to do if your class goes to the pumpkin patch and brings back pumpkins!  This is the only paid item on the list for $3.50.  These come from my own classroom of third graders several years ago–most appropriate for grades 3-5.

 

Need a Beginning of the Year Lesson for Symmetry?

This lesson was almost an accident, but it turned out so well!  Not knowing I was going to have to teach a particular class, I desperately went in search of the librarian’s expertise for a beginning of the year book. I couldn’t find the book I was looking for so she gladly showed me this book.


I read the students the story, calling particular attention to the stamp she receives from her grandmother, and then I had students make stamps.  In order to do this I used some bottle caps we had been collecting. Sadly, I spent too long at home hot gluing foam squares to bottle cap lids.

 

I was kind of worried that if the squares weren’t perfectly rectangular or square it would not look good when students stamped their letters, but actually kids wasn’t able to tell after the stamp was pressed down.  It really just mattered where the pressure was when the stamp was pressed down.

When I brought these to school, I had kids find the Korean letter that corresponded to one of their initials.  I used this page I found after a Google search.  Then I had students write their Korean initial once, draw a line of symmetry and flip the Korean letter over before they carved it into their stamp.  Because not every letter of the Korean alphabet corresponds to an English letter, I had students find the Korean letter that most closely corresponded.  I also gave them the option of picking a letter from their middle or last name if their first initial didn’t correspond to a Korean letter.  Students carved with their pencil into the foam.

Here are some of the results.  I let the kids take their stamps home.  NOTE:  If you don’t want stamp ink everywhere invest in some baggies for them to put their stamps into.

I did this with both first and second graders.  I was a little nervous about doing this with first graders, but they handled it like champs (one of my stamp pads was worse for the wear due to a first grader I might add).  I would do this lesson again, and it was such a rich lesson.  There were connections in the book to another country, the Korean alphabet offered a connection to another language, and the symmetry added a math connection.  The whole lesson took three class periods of 30 minutes each. Happy stamping! 🙂

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